10 things you should know if you give birth by C-section

10 things you should know if you give birth by C-section

1 Following surgery you will probably feel sleepy and nauseous for about 48 hours. You may also feel a slight itching caused by the medication added to the epidural anesthesia. Your doctor will prescribe whatever medication is needed to relieve these discomforts. 2 When you are given epidural anesthesia mixed with morphine (good for relieving pain) the effect can last up to 24 hours without the numbness caused by other medications. You will then be given other medications which will relieve the discomforts of the surgery itself, acetaminophen and ibuprofen being the most common. Most likely this cocktail of medications will contain a stool softener so as to avoid the constipation caused by all the medications. 3 For the first days you feel numbness and pain at the incision. You will notice that this is slightly swollen and discolored. You will also be uncomfortable when exerting the slightest force, such as sneezing, coughing, sitting up or any other movement that puts stress on the abdominal area. We recommend using your arms and hands to help yourself sit up, and that you apply slight pressure with a pillow over the incision when you laugh, cough or sneeze. 4 If you are going to breastfeed, we recommend that you start the baby-feeding process while still in the hospital, just after surgery, so that you can get help from the nurses on the correct placement of the baby at your breast. Most probably a few days after surgery the breastfeeding process will be more challenging because you will feel pain at the incision that is still healing. If need be. get help and advice on this subject from experts and from other mothers who have been through the same process. Over time, find the position that makes both you and your baby comfortable, as this way you will avoid split and painful nipples. 5 Insofar as concerns the intravenous drip and the urinary drain, these should be removed some 12 hours after surgery. As you recuperate, you can begin drinking juice or water, and eating solids when you feel hungry, usually six to eight hours after leaving the operating room. The most common discomfort in this regard is intestinal gas, so you will feel bloated for the first week. 6 As long as you are in the hospital, the nurses will ask you to get out of bed a walk a little, at least a couple of times each day. Do not do this by yourself, wait for help to stand up. When you do get up, make slight movements with your legs, especially to help the circulation in the legs, ankles and feet. 7 In addition to walking, it is also important that you urinate frequently, because if you have a full bladder it will make it more difficult for your uterus to contract and there will be more pressure on the incision. 8 The stitches or staples at your incision can be removed by your doctor some three or four days following surgery. This will take only a few minutes and will cause very little pain, rather you will feel something like a little prick or pinch. 9 Once at home you will need all the help and support you can get from your partner and family. When we say help, we mean !Lots of help! And your family mush understand that. If you don't have enough help from your family members, then consider hiring someone for support because you really will need it.10 Drink plenty of fluids to avoid constipation. Be very patient with your body, you will gradually see the scar improve and your discomfort will decrease progressively. Any irregularity that you know or suspect may not be part of a normal and healthy recuperation should immediately be brought to the attention of your doctor so all post operation complications can be avoided.



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